J-Pouch Surgery

J-Pouch Procedure

If your ulcerative colitis inflammation and symptoms have not been controlled by medications, your doctor may have recommended a common type of surgery to construct an Ileal Pouch Anal Anastamosis, or (IPAA). It involves removing the colon and rectum to form what is often referred to as a “j-pouch”. This surgery may occur in one, two, or three stages depending on your health. Below is a description of the most common procedure, involving two stages. View the animated video above for this description.

During the first surgery, the colon and rectum are removed, and a pouch, commonly in the form of a “J”, is created at the end of the small intestine and joined to the top of the anal canal. At the same time a temporary opening, known as a loop ileostomy, is created. The ileostomy will allow waste to pass through the abdominal wall into an ostomy bag while the newly formed pouch heals.

The second surgery occurs after 8 to 12 weeks, once the pouch is healthy. At this time the ileostomy is closed and the two ends of the bowel are re-attached. Waste is now able to pass through the small intestine, collect in the pouch, and out through the anus.

For more information about surgery for inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, please visit http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/assets/pdfs/surgery_brochure_final.pdf

The information and video above have been provided with kind permission from the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America.

The mission of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation is to cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of children and adults affected by these diseases. The Foundation offers helpful educational resources to help patients cope with these diseases and better manage their health. To gain access to our educational material, please visit: http://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/science-and-professionals/programs-materials/patient-brochures/

The Crohn's and Colitis Charity

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